Matching your car to a caravan

MauriceJ replied on 01/08/2019 12:56

Posted on 01/08/2019 12:56

Well I have just sold my old unit and was looking to replace it with a newer one. I used the Match your car to your caravan tool here on the C&MHC Website and it is telling me that no new unit is compatible with any caravan under 10 years old.

How reliable is this tool and is there an alternative way of checking compatibility of car to caravan??

 

flatcoat replied on 01/08/2019 16:19

Posted on 01/08/2019 16:19

The club matching service is rubbish, google towcar weights or similar and you will find a number of free access websites. However i am slightly confused whether it is the car or caravan you are replacing. 

rjb replied on 01/08/2019 17:31

Posted on 01/08/2019 17:31

Try towsure on there website that is what I use

lornalou1 replied on 01/08/2019 20:58

Posted on 01/08/2019 16:19 by flatcoat

The club matching service is rubbish, google towcar weights or similar and you will find a number of free access websites. However i am slightly confused whether it is the car or caravan you are replacing. 

Posted on 01/08/2019 20:58

thinking the same. changing car or van, if car always check V5c for kerb weight or mass in service weights.

Lutz replied on 01/08/2019 22:16

Posted on 01/08/2019 20:58 by lornalou1

thinking the same. changing car or van, if car always check V5c for kerb weight or mass in service weights.

Posted on 01/08/2019 22:16

You'll find mass in service on the V5c, but not kerbweight. There can be quite a big difference between the two.

LeTouriste replied on 02/08/2019 11:26

Posted on 02/08/2019 11:26

In the past, meeting the legal requirements was always a bit of a nightmare.  Now that I pull our 1500kg MTPLM van with a VW Caravelle, I can at least relax by only needing to watch the van's max permitted weight and the noseweight.  The Caravelle max. weights are all well above our needs.  But I still raise and lower the small difference in tyre pressures between "normal" driving and when loaded and towing.

DS3 replied on 12/08/2019 01:21

Posted on 12/08/2019 01:21

The weights of the car are on a weight plate, usually on a front door frame or under the bonnet. From this you can work out what the car can tow. I thought tow weights were on the V5? Anyway, if you have a new car, weights are nearly always in the brochure, or on the manufacturers website.

 

Lutz replied on 12/08/2019 07:00

Posted on 12/08/2019 01:21 by DS3

The weights of the car are on a weight plate, usually on a front door frame or under the bonnet. From this you can work out what the car can tow. I thought tow weights were on the V5? Anyway, if you have a new car, weights are nearly always in the brochure, or on the manufacturers website.

 

Posted on 12/08/2019 07:00

Using figures gleaned from a brochure or website can be risky because one can't guarantee that either are always up-to-date. Manufacturers sometimes change their specifications in the course of a model year, such as if a new engine replaces an older one, and this is not always immediately reflected in published data. For definitive information, one must always refer to the plated weights or the Certificate of Conformity.

The tow weight shown on the V5 is not legally enforceable because there is no law which says that it's an offence to exceed it. On the other hand, the plated weights, including the gross train weight, are enforceable.

LeTouriste replied on 12/08/2019 13:04

Posted on 12/08/2019 13:04

I would agree that trusting a brochure is risky but, if the manufacturer and the DVLA have done their work properly, The vehicle's plated weight, its handbook and the V5 should all agree.

lornalou1 replied on 12/08/2019 14:43

Posted on 01/08/2019 22:16 by Lutz

You'll find mass in service on the V5c, but not kerbweight. There can be quite a big difference between the two.

Posted on 12/08/2019 14:43

how would newby's know the difference between the two if only one is printed on the v5c. undecided