February Magazine - Nick Lomas EVs

RollerMan181 replied on 29/01/2021 12:55

Posted on 29/01/2021 12:55

I started to read the Nick Lomas' article published in this month’s magazine regarding the transition towards electric vehicles with scepticism at first. Having owned two electric vehicles for over 4 years, I have seen so much biased reporting by ill informed journalists or in journals with “other” agendas that are clearly out to recredit EVs, that I thought here we go again.

So it started off well, then I got to the bombshell. The article states that running costs are lower and implies that, this will go a long way to offset the initial costs of purchase.  Very true, in my case, the cost of the lease and low charging costs mean that I can run an EV for much less than that of a comparable petrol or diesel car. Then he states that it costs £20 to charge “at home”!  Where on earth did he get that figure from? Well done he just may have alienated thousands of potential people thinking about converting to an EV.

Please find below the true cost of charging at home on an Economy 7 tariff

KIA SOUL EV (30KWh battery). To charge from 50% to 100%  will give a total range of 130 miles in summer, 100 miles in winter)

DAY RATE £2.47 plus vat @5%

NIGHT RATE £1.59 plus vat @5%

The latest KIA SOUL EV, (64KWh battery) for comparison will do more than twice the range, so to charge from 50% to 100% :-

DAY RATE £5.28 plus vat @5%

NIGHT RATE £2.97 plus vat @5%

I have Economy 7 tariff and additionally I have solar panels, so when the sun is shining, any excess electricity goes in to my car. So I can charge for free sometimes. Even at Public chargers that charge 30p per KW, I’ve never got anywhere near paying £20. Last year I did 10k miles for less than £300.

So to allow people to make informed decisions,  could you please add a correction in next month's magazine.

 David Bell

Moved from the Story Section

JVB66 replied on 29/01/2021 19:51

Posted on 29/01/2021 19:51

It is not the cost of charging an EV that puts many off buying/leasing an EV it will as  many others who do not have solar panels or access to economy 7 meters it is the national shortage of infrastructure that in this area as many others ,there is no way home charging can be accessed ,

JVB66 replied on 29/01/2021 20:07

Posted on 29/01/2021 19:51 by JVB66

Posted on 29/01/2021 20:07

Ps have just checked prices to charge jag i pace

home empty to full £11.97  70 +hrs?

public charge  20%-80% £13.34

so it depends on what the car is needed for, and they do not publisize towing figures

brue replied on 29/01/2021 20:32

Posted on 29/01/2021 20:32

We have an EV, no economy 7 or solar and charging costs around £3, mostly less as it's often a part charge. 

Charging costs are available on the utility web sites.

Stewart P replied on 30/01/2021 15:19

Posted on 30/01/2021 15:19

I'm sure the Government won't keep the zero tax for electric vehicles for long once the sales of internal combustion engined cars drop in favour of electric sufficiently and they will also have to find a way of recovering the loss of fuel duty somehow. Don't expect electric vehicle running costs to stay low for long!

EasyT replied on 30/01/2021 16:42

Posted on 30/01/2021 16:42

The cost of charging an EV does not concern me. The range and lack of facilities would.

DavidKlyne replied on 30/01/2021 20:37

Posted on 30/01/2021 15:19 by Stewart P

I'm sure the Government won't keep the zero tax for electric vehicles for long once the sales of internal combustion engined cars drop in favour of electric sufficiently and they will also have to find a way of recovering the loss of fuel duty somehow. Don't expect electric vehicle running costs to stay low for long!

Posted on 30/01/2021 20:37

It wouldn't quite go with their green credentials to tax electric vehicles? There is an issue here as you can't tax the fuel as that would mean cost of electricity would have to increase and the use of electricity for charging cars will only be one element of use. Perhaps they will be tempted to go for road charging which you could make a case for as it has the effect of encouraging people onto public transport and reducing congestion. Also any Government keen to get people to change over to electric vehicles wouldn't want to put that at risk by increasing the cost. It will be interesting to see how any future Government cope with the shortfall of fuel tax revenues. Perhaps a pound a bottle on wine might help!!!

David

JVB66 replied on 10/02/2021 11:41

Posted on 10/02/2021 11:41

Just been reading an article in my company (railway)magazine by a professor from Cornwall who has been studying claims by  ev makers of the distances their vehicles can cover on a single charge,

It seems the max miles per charge are based on an average speed of 30kph,   the chart then goes on to give mpk until the 70mph equivelant  being used, which could mean for every hour travelled it could mean a 45min rechargesurprised

That is without a caravan on the hookundecided

Ps it was in answer to whether long distance travel in the future would see a resurgence in motor rail servicescool

 

 

DavidKlyne replied on 10/02/2021 14:52

Posted on 10/02/2021 11:41 by JVB66

Just been reading an article in my company (railway)magazine by a professor from Cornwall who has been studying claims by  ev makers of the distances their vehicles can cover on a single charge,

It seems the max miles per charge are based on an average speed of 30kph,   the chart then goes on to give mpk until the 70mph equivelant  being used, which could mean for every hour travelled it could mean a 45min rechargesurprised

That is without a caravan on the hookundecided

Ps it was in answer to whether long distance travel in the future would see a resurgence in motor rail servicescool

 

 

Posted on 10/02/2021 14:52

Fortunately there are lots of "real world" tests out there that give a fairly good impression of real range of EV cars. Whilst I accept that probably manufacturers figures should  be taken with a pinch of sort, a bit like Kia mpg figures wink. I rather fancy a Kia E-Niro but at £38000 for the long range version that would be an extravagance so it looks as if I will stick with petrol for a while longer.

JVB66 replied on 10/02/2021 15:06

Posted on 10/02/2021 14:52 by DavidKlyne

Fortunately there are lots of "real world" tests out there that give a fairly good impression of real range of EV cars. Whilst I accept that probably manufacturers figures should  be taken with a pinch of sort, a bit like Kia mpg figures wink. I rather fancy a Kia E-Niro but at £38000 for the long range version that would be an extravagance so it looks as if I will stick with petrol for a while longer.

Posted on 10/02/2021 15:06

Real world?undecided I think this man is quite an expert on what he advises cool 

Ps as the review of the Nero states, the mile per charge is possible as long as it is not at motorway speedssurprised