Environment v quality of life

LeTouriste replied on 24/08/2019 13:01

Posted on 24/08/2019 13:01

We are being advised to avoid eating red meat and dairy products, to eliminate cattle and reduce production of methane.  One MP suggests we should scrap all our cars.   The Amazon rain forest, which produces 20% of Earth's oxygen and soaks up CO2, is seriously under threat.  The oceans are being polluted at an alarming rate, and coral reefs are dying in vast numbers.  Household refuse is becoming difficult to manage, and recycling has a long way to go before it becomes really effective.  Oh dear, what a boring outlook for future generations.  It's great to be old!smile

Tinwheeler replied on 24/08/2019 14:03

Posted on 24/08/2019 14:03

Likewise. While it’s good to feel that I've seen the best of things and the future's not going to bother me personally, I do feel for the younger generations who seem to have a very different future to look forward to in so many ways😕

brue replied on 24/08/2019 14:10

Posted on 24/08/2019 14:10

Many of us had to endure the h bomb testing era, that was pretty scary. Every generation will have to endure something difficult whilst seeing other types of progress. No I don't think it's great to be old and I don't feel smug about anything, we all share this planet, whatever age we are. smile

Wherenext replied on 24/08/2019 14:26

Posted on 24/08/2019 14:26

I'll do the best I can but I'm no saint and will still carry on caravanning which means using a polluting vehicle etc.

However, I can't help but feel that Mother Earth can't wait for us to go the way of the dinosaurs. She's given us so much and has such beauty and what have we done to thank her? Acted like the worst kind of vandal and descrecrated her at every opportunity. 

Any other planet with life supporting atmosphere must fervently hope that these disgusting neighbours don't find their way to them.

Dorset Diver replied on 24/08/2019 14:28

Posted on 24/08/2019 14:28

Perhaps we could scrap cars and maybe go back to horses, but I guess they also burp. 

I look at all the positive thing the postwar generations have done for this country and the world and generally I'm quite proud of what we achieved.  Figuratively speaking, when I hung up my work boots I also hung up my worry beads.  It is now up to the current generations to take thing forward.  

LeTouriste replied on 24/08/2019 14:37

Posted on 24/08/2019 14:37

It isn't anything to do with being smug.  We follow the rules in the best interests of the planet within our practical capability.  Rubbish and food waste kept to a minimum. Recycling done wherever applicable.  I do not allow my engine to idle unnecessarily (fancy it being a requirement to penalise drivers to bring them into line. Shame on them!).  I only have a large motor because I pull a caravan, although the exhaust system gases are cleaned by an ad blue system and DPF.  I am retired so mileage is low, and we use our bus passes wherever possible - both at home and when on holiday. And we also have young family members for whom we share concerns, alongside all the young folk.

My "great to be old" was a bit tongue-in-cheek, and harkened back to a time when we were young ourselves - a time when people cared about others besides themselves - but most of us were kept ignorant of the threat to come, which has been highlighted largely through the social media, better reporting, and successive governments' inability to keep things hidden.  And yet in spite of the dangers, various governments are at odds with each other instead of joining in a concerted effort to turn things around.  That would still take time, but current attitudes are likely to make changes impossible.  As one learned professor pointed out, "We only have one Earth."

cyberyacht replied on 24/08/2019 16:26

Posted on 24/08/2019 16:26

Amidst all the talk of climate change, we hear little about population growth. Any given land area has a finite capability to produce food/water. I fear that until we address this issue as well, were are headed for disaster.

LeTouriste replied on 24/08/2019 17:09

Posted on 24/08/2019 17:09

Absolutely correct, cyberyacht.  But the issue has negatives as well as positives.  Population growth produces more global warming which is exacerbated by clearing more land for human occupation.   Medical science has prevented early deaths and also prolonged life for the elderly, which in turn further increases the rate of population growth.      The reduction in regular large scale warring of nations has cut the annual deaths and early demise of thousands of would-be warriors, left instead to stay at home and breed still more children.

When (if) all the technological advances are exhausted and the climate change still goes in the wrong direction, is there a risk that the population explosion will be resolved by means of what we today regard as inhuman and unacceptable?   One day, food production will stagnate, major unrest will prevail, and brutal regimes may arise to settle the problem.  Not a nice thought, but not impossible either.

DavidKlyne replied on 24/08/2019 21:47

Posted on 24/08/2019 21:47

As a 73 year old I can't change the world, I can only change what I do. I have made sure my house is as insulated as it can be so that I use less energy, which saves me money. I doubt I drive more than 5000 miles a year. I don't fly anywhere. I try and use public transport where that is practical, especially when out and about in the motorhome. For the past 10 or so years we have been using Waitrose Quick Check where we scan our own shopping and pack it in bags that are years old so during that time we have probably saved in the region of 5000 plastic bags. We only buy what we can eat and the little waste we have goes for composting. That is just my meager contribution to saving the planet.

The Government could do so much more. Why don't they subsidise me having solar panels so that I could contribute to reducing the amount of electricity I use? Why do they charge VAT on Electric Cars? If the Government were actually serious about the environment they would be doing a lot more even if it meant being unpopular.

And older people we could stop vilifying the likes of Greta Thunberg and Extinction Rebelion. 

David

Pliers replied on 24/08/2019 22:19

Posted on 24/08/2019 21:47 by DavidKlyne

As a 73 year old I can't change the world, I can only change what I do. I have made sure my house is as insulated as it can be so that I use less energy, which saves me money. I doubt I drive more than 5000 miles a year. I don't fly anywhere. I try and use public transport where that is practical, especially when out and about in the motorhome. For the past 10 or so years we have been using Waitrose Quick Check where we scan our own shopping and pack it in bags that are years old so during that time we have probably saved in the region of 5000 plastic bags. We only buy what we can eat and the little waste we have goes for composting. That is just my meager contribution to saving the planet.

The Government could do so much more. Why don't they subsidise me having solar panels so that I could contribute to reducing the amount of electricity I use? Why do they charge VAT on Electric Cars? If the Government were actually serious about the environment they would be doing a lot more even if it meant being unpopular.

As older people we could stop vilifying the likes of Greta Thunberg and Extinction Rebelion. 

David

Posted on 24/08/2019 22:19

Who's vilifying Greta?

Not me!

And I'm a 70 year old. Don't paint us all with the same brush.....🤔