Best reads - Club Together Book Club?

Rowena replied on 03/01/2014 12:47

Posted on 03/01/2014 12:47

I'm just about coming to the end of Deborah Moggach’s book, Heartbreak Hotel. I found it a very enjoyable read and very amusing. But what should I read next? Any recommendations? 

I also wondered if anyone would be interested in a Club Together book club? According to a member survey earlier last year, reading is the most recurring leisure activity whilst caravanning. I know I’m a book worm and I’m sure there’s a few of us out there who enjoy a good read. Anyone interested or any suggestions? 

Wherenext replied on 21/04/2021 15:24

Posted on 30/03/2021 20:50 by nelliethehooker

Have read Deadland, and I see that the first 3, The Birdwatcher, Salt Lane and Deadlands, are available as a combination for £2:99 on Kindle at the moment. 

WN, the next in the series is Graves End which comes before The Trawlerman, neither of which I've purchased yet.

Posted on 21/04/2021 15:24

Picked up Graves End from the library yesterday along with the Bill Bryson book.

Just reading The Coffin Makers Garden as mentioned by Moulesy as it's time restricted, i.e. has to go back soon.

Funnily enough I didn't find  Connelly's Jack McEvoy a very easy person to have empathy with, not like Bosch. Still well written but not one to be repeated for me.

nelliethehooker replied on 03/05/2021 21:26

Posted on 03/05/2021 21:26

For those that like Scottish detective books there is a series of 6 by G R Jordan, based mainly on the Scottish Islands, in sale for 99p for the set at the moment on Kindle.

DavidKlyne replied on 16/05/2021 09:08

Posted on 16/05/2021 09:08

Just finished a fascinating book called "What Does Jeremy Think". It is a biography of the late Jeremy Heywood written by his wife Suzanne. He was eventually Cabinet Secretary and Head of the Civil Service. It charts his career from when he worked for Norman Lamont through all PM's since then to Theresa May until his untimely death in 2018. I think we often don't realise how much various Governments rely on Civil Servants and the serious role they play is so far removed from the comical Sir Humphrey!!!

David

Wherenext replied on 22/05/2021 13:36

Posted on 22/05/2021 13:36

Picked up library book today. Born in a burial Gown by MW Craven.

Slowly working my way through Bill Brysons Illustrated Shakespeare, half an hour a day. I've read it before but Brue reminded me of it a while ago and it's amazing how much one forgets and how quickly. Thoroughly enjoyable though.

Wherenext replied on 02/06/2021 20:14

Posted on 02/06/2021 20:14

Finished the Craven book. Looking to reserve the second one in the series now.

Bryson went back before we came away and I'm satisfied that Johnson won't add to the nations understanding of the Great Bard.

moulesy replied on 09/06/2021 16:37

Posted on 09/06/2021 16:37

I'm reading Richard Osman's debut novel " The Thursday Murder Club". I've been resisting up to now because I think books written by TV personalities often turn out to be pretty pointless (see what I did there? wink). But in fact it's a very clever murder mystery and very, very wittily written. Nothing very intellectual but easy holiday reading and you can bet your life it'll be turned into  TV series before too long. smile

DavidKlyne replied on 10/06/2021 15:28

Posted on 09/06/2021 16:37 by moulesy

I'm reading Richard Osman's debut novel " The Thursday Murder Club". I've been resisting up to now because I think books written by TV personalities often turn out to be pretty pointless (see what I did there? wink). But in fact it's a very clever murder mystery and very, very wittily written. Nothing very intellectual but easy holiday reading and you can bet your life it'll be turned into  TV series before too long. smile

Posted on 10/06/2021 15:28

Margaret has given me the book to read, although I don't usually bother with fiction. Haven't started yet. She has now read it twice and been very disappointed with the simplicity of it. Margaret reads a lot of detective based fiction and likes to be challenged when reading. I have heard that it is already going to be made into a film.

David

Goldie146 replied on 10/06/2021 16:10

Posted on 10/06/2021 15:28 by DavidKlyne

Margaret has given me the book to read, although I don't usually bother with fiction. Haven't started yet. She has now read it twice and been very disappointed with the simplicity of it. Margaret reads a lot of detective based fiction and likes to be challenged when reading. I have heard that it is already going to be made into a film.

David

Posted on 10/06/2021 16:10

I've just dowmloaded it onto my Kindle ready for our holiday next week. I'm still not sure if I will like it, having read reviews, but the price has come down. I've a stack (virtual) of books now ready for all the sitting in the sun we're going to do. We save on weight and storage etc by me using my Kindle and my husband taking real books.

brue replied on 10/06/2021 16:58

Posted on 10/06/2021 16:58

I enjoyed reading it, I bought the book and and liked the people observations in it, nothing like your average detective/thriller, quite a good tale in itself.

I'm reading about The Fens at the moment (kindle) a non fiction book by Francis Priyor. It's all about his life and archaeology works. A lot more organised farming in the Bronze age than people realised and some nice writing about previous generations. The poet John Clare gets his praise.

My kindle didn't work properly on our last break, all set to enjoy a political diary and nothing happened. I think I've sorted it now but it pays to take a real book just in case!