Life on the road

LLM replied on 25/11/2020 10:17

Posted on 25/11/2020 10:17

It's a good job our ancestors didn't worry about every detail before they went exploring πŸ™‚.

eurortraveller replied on 25/11/2020 11:35

Posted on 25/11/2020 09:46 by LLM

 Does it not depend on deal or no deal?

Posted on 25/11/2020 11:35

Afraid not.

Canada has a trade deal with the EU - which the UK would like to copy - but Canadians visiting the EU have a 90 day limit unless they can get a long stay visa.

The UK voted to end free  movement,  and as a result full time motorhoming in Europe will be a thing of the past. 

Rocky 2 buckets replied on 25/11/2020 12:34

Posted on 25/11/2020 10:17 by LLM

It's a good job our ancestors didn't worry about every detail before they went exploring πŸ™‚.

Posted on 25/11/2020 12:34

True, if they did more of them would’ve made it back homeπŸ˜‚

LLM replied on 25/11/2020 13:54

Posted on 25/11/2020 11:35 by eurortraveller

Afraid not.

Canada has a trade deal with the EU - which the UK would like to copy - but Canadians visiting the EU have a 90 day limit unless they can get a long stay visa.

The UK voted to end free  movement,  and as a result full time motorhoming in Europe will be a thing of the past. 

Posted on 25/11/2020 13:54

The deal is not yet done and whilst the Canadian deal was muted as a model I think it unlikely that any deal we make (if any) will be entirely identical.  I'm content to wait and see.  In any event I suspect that the number of Canadians bringing MH's to Europe is relatively few laughing.   

Philnffc replied on 25/11/2020 20:37

Posted on 25/11/2020 08:54 by LLM

I'm interested to know why you have written some of those things.

Insurance.  I assume you mean their vehicle (camper) insurance.  Mine cover us for 12 months abroad if that is what we choose.  We just have to have a UK address.

MOT.  An MOT is normally for 12 months and is valid wherever you are.

UK (NHS) health cover is more tricky but it is relatively easy to get around the rules.  Many full timers do.

Not sure what you mean about NHS card invalid?

EHIC (RIP) laughing.

Banking is fine as long as you maintain a UK address.

I say good luck to them.  I wish I had done much the same at their age.

Posted on 25/11/2020 20:37

No insurance invalidates your MOT and  visa versa

I was trying to point the point out some of the pit falls we faced in the eleven years we full timed and always found it better to keep mum i will now but out of this thread.

Phil

 

Tinwheeler replied on 25/11/2020 20:45

Posted on 25/11/2020 20:37 by Philnffc

No insurance invalidates your MOT and  visa versa

I was trying to point the point out some of the pit falls we faced in the eleven years we full timed and always found it better to keep mum i will now but out of this thread.

Phil

 

Posted on 25/11/2020 20:45

I’m puzzled by that Phil. To the best of my knowledge, it's not essential to have insurance to pass an MOT so I cannot see that the absence of insurance would invalidate an MOT.

The reverse, however, is certainly likely to be true.

LLM replied on 25/11/2020 21:11

Posted on 25/11/2020 20:37 by Philnffc

No insurance invalidates your MOT and  visa versa

I was trying to point the point out some of the pit falls we faced in the eleven years we full timed and always found it better to keep mum i will now but out of this thread.

Phil

 

Posted on 25/11/2020 21:11

You are 50% correct.  Not having a valid MOT does invalidate your insurance.  Quite logical really as you have no record of the vehicle being road worthy at least once in a 12 month period.  Of course it only applies to vehicles that are required to have an MOT.  Not having insurance does not invalidate your MOT.  Not having a valid MOT is illegal under Section 47 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 and you run the risk of facing a £1,000 fine and a charge of six to eight penalty points on your licence by driving without one.

There are certainly challenges to be overcome when full timing but you clearly overcame them if you did it for 11 years.  

AnotherDavid replied on 25/11/2020 22:28

Posted on 25/11/2020 20:45 by Tinwheeler

I’m puzzled by that Phil. To the best of my knowledge, it's not essential to have insurance to pass an MOT so I cannot see that the absence of insurance would invalidate an MOT.

The reverse, however, is certainly likely to be true.

Posted on 25/11/2020 22:28

How does one drive on UK roads to an mot test station in order to get an MOT test done without valid insurance?

Tinwheeler replied on 25/11/2020 22:31

Posted on 25/11/2020 22:28 by AnotherDavid

How does one drive on UK roads to an mot test station in order to get an MOT test done without valid insurance?

Posted on 25/11/2020 22:31

Irrelevant, David. One can drive illegally or transport the vehicle on a trailer. Neither will prevent the examiner carrying out the MOT and issuing a pass if warranted. The MOT examiner is not there to police the insurance laws.

EasyT replied on 25/11/2020 22:34

Posted on 25/11/2020 22:28 by AnotherDavid

How does one drive on UK roads to an mot test station in order to get an MOT test done without valid insurance?

Posted on 25/11/2020 22:34

illegally unless the garage picks it up on trade plates