CV 19 Vaccination Certification?

LLM replied on 22/11/2020 12:09

Posted on 22/11/2020 12:09

Today, whilst having a clear-out, I came across a comprehensive list of vaccinations I received over the many years I was travelling abroad.  The certified list included the date each vaccine was given, by whom, where, and the vaccine type, quantity, batch and dates effective from and to.  In fact all the info needed to prove I was protected.  Only once did it come in useful when I was able to travel into and out of a particular country area because I was ‘covered’.

It set me thinking about the coming (I hope) CV 19 vaccine(s).  Will those of us be able to travel abroad because we have been vaccinated?  Will we need to prove this and if so how?  Will we need different vaccines for different countries and/or areas?  Will we need more than one jab?  Will insurance companies want proof of vaccination before providing medical cover?  Will there be an international gold standard vaccine, or will different countries choose different types as their preferred option?  Okay, I don’t know the answers and I doubt if anyone else does but I do wonder just how long it will be before we can return to freely and safely travelling the world, or even Europe. 

LLM replied on 23/11/2020 18:14

Posted on 23/11/2020 18:14

Nice to hear that the Oxford Astra Z vaccine is looking good and relatively useable as it can be stored at normal fridge temperatures.

Lutz replied on 23/11/2020 20:11

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:11

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine does not have to be stored at such low temperatures until it is administered. During the last 5 days prior to use it is sufficient to store it in a fridge. The logistics of handling it are therefore not quite as daunting as one may fear.

JVB66 replied on 23/11/2020 20:15

Posted on 23/11/2020 18:14 by LLM

Nice to hear that the Oxford Astra Z vaccine is looking good and relatively useable as it can be stored at normal fridge temperatures.

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:15

It is also cheaper than others and being manufactured and sold for no profitsurprised

LLM replied on 23/11/2020 20:23

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:11 by Lutz

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine does not have to be stored at such low temperatures until it is administered. During the last 5 days prior to use it is sufficient to store it in a fridge. The logistics of handling it are therefore not quite as daunting as one may fear.

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:23

That seems illogical to me.  What is the storage to administration sequence?

Taken from a learned paper / report:

...these vaccines, which use strands of genetic material known as mRNA, also have some stringent temperature requirements. Moderna’s vaccine requires long-term storage at minus 20 degrees Celsius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit) and is stable for 30 days between 2 degrees to 8 degrees Celsius (36 degrees to 46 degrees Fahrenheit). Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine, however, requires some of the coldest temperatures of any vaccine under consideration: minus 70 degrees Celsius (minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit) or lower.

Lutz replied on 23/11/2020 20:57

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:23 by LLM

That seems illogical to me.  What is the storage to administration sequence?

Taken from a learned paper / report:

...these vaccines, which use strands of genetic material known as mRNA, also have some stringent temperature requirements. Moderna’s vaccine requires long-term storage at minus 20 degrees Celsius (minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit) and is stable for 30 days between 2 degrees to 8 degrees Celsius (36 degrees to 46 degrees Fahrenheit). Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine, however, requires some of the coldest temperatures of any vaccine under consideration: minus 70 degrees Celsius (minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit) or lower.

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:57

It is true that the vaccine must be stored at -70°C in the chain from the manufacturer to the clinic where it will eventually be administered, but there it will presumably be administered relatively quickly. For short periods of time, the clinics themselves will only have to store it at normal fridge temperatures.

That is one reason why the vaccine will be administered only in specific clinics, not by GP's in general.

Wherenext replied on 23/11/2020 20:57

Posted on 23/11/2020 20:57

Because it only has a short shelf life once it leaves that minus 70°C, a bit like defrosting a piece of chicken from the freezer. Fine for 24-36 hours but it goes off after that.

I believe Pfizer have stated that 5 days is the maximum period the RNA can be relied on to stay active.

Edit - Crossed with Lutz's post.